Devotions for Teachers

Devotions for the Classroom

The Last Word

Interactive Classroom Devotional- Science/Bible/Art

(May be adapted for a puppet show)

Topic:   My Words—Do They Help?

Scripture: Ephesians 4:29; Proverbs 15:23; 1 Peter 3:9; Proverbs 10:19; Psalm 19:14

Level: Primary/Early Intermediate

Hook:  Why do we need words? What do we do with them? This story is about two girls who wanted to be the last one talking.  Listen to see if they used their words correctly.

Activity: 

-Read story

-Questions:

-Why did each girl want to be the last one talking? (It made her feel more important; she felt like she had won)

-Was it helpful to be the last one talking? Why or why not?

-Was it helpful to make more and more words?  Why or why not?

-Why is it important to think about our words? (They make God and others happy or sad; they can help people know about God or turn away from God)

-Do my words HELP?

Help (Do they help the situation that I am in?)

Edify (Do they encourage or give ‘put ups’ to the other person?)

Love (Do they show that I love the other person more than myself?)

Please God (Do they show God that I love Him most of all and want to obey Him?)

The Last Word

Alyssa and Zoe were friends most of the time, except when they weren’t friends.  Today, they weren’t.  Both girls wanted to be the one to say the very last word.  Let’s listen in and see how things change.

“I am going to be the last one talking,” said Alyssa.

“No, I’m going to be the last one talking,” said Zoe.

“I’m going to be the last one,” said Alyssa.

“I’m going to be the last,” said Zoe.

“I’m last,” said Alyssa.

“Last,” said Zoe.

Then, Alyssa had an idea.

“Let’s not do last word, let’s do longest sentence,” she said.

“Do we need to count our words to make sure we have the longest sentence?” Zoe asked.

“No, you don’t need to count your words to make sure you have the longest sentence, just keep adding on to the other person’s sentence,” said Alyssa.

“So, I don’t need to count my words to make sure I have the longest sentence, but just keep adding on to your sentence, and then I will have the longest sentence?” Zoe asked.

“Right, you don’t need to count your words to make sure that you have the longest sentence, but just keep adding on to your sentence, then you will have the longest sentence until I add more words and make mine the longest sentence,” said Alyssa.

Did Alyssa’s idea work?  Let’s see if Zoe had a better idea.

“Let’s not do longest, let’s do…rhymingest,” said Zoe.

“Rhymingest is not even a word,” said Alyssa.

“Yes it is, because I just said it,” said Zoe.

“Well, if rhymingest is a word, then so is…broccolishness,” said Alyssa.

“And so is…and so is…lemonosity,” said Zoe.

“So is…pencilectomy,” said Alyssa.

Are their words getting better?

“Why are we making up these words?” asked Zoe.

“Because we both want to have the last one,” said Alyssa.

Help—will you two girls please stop!  This is getting really boring!

“This is getting really boring.  Why do we want to have the last one?” asked Zoe.

“Because we both said we wanted to,” said Alyssa.

“But how do we stop?” asked Zoe.

“I don’t know—you stop,” said Alyssa.

“No, you stop,” said Zoe.

“You,” said Alyssa.

“You,” said Zoe.

“Let’s both say the last word together, and then we can be done,” said Alyssa.

“Good idea—I’m tired of this.  I don’t want to talk anymore,” said Zoe.

“What’s our last word?” asked Alyssa.

I know one!  I’ll pick it!

“I don’t know—you pick it,” said Zoe.

“No, you pick it,” said Alyssa.

“You,” said Zoe.

“You,” said Alyssa.

“OK, ‘you’ is our last word.  When I count to three, let’s say it together,” said Zoe.

“OK,” said Alyssa.

“One…two…”

“Wait—what will we do when we’re done talking?” asked Alyssa.

“I don’t know…go home?” said Zoe.

“No, I still want to hang out,” said Alyssa.

“OK, let’s just say that we can still hang out and talk, we just don’t have to have the last word,” said Zoe.

“OK—so count again.  I promise I won’t interrupt,” said Alyssa.

“OK—one…two…three…,” began Zoe.

“…wait!  I forgot the word!” said Alyssa.

“You,” said Zoe.

“Oh yeah…OK—go again,” said Alyssa.

“OK—onetwothree…” said Zoe.

“You!”  They said it together.

“Wow—I’m glad that’s over with,” said Alyssa.

“Me too—I never want to have the last word again,” said Zoe.  “It’s too hard and boring.”

And they didn’t…at least not that day.